Nashville Five /// Adia Victoria

It’s not easy to find out a lot about the music of Adia Victoria – there’s no overflowing Bandcamp account to speak of, no barrage of handmade Youtube videos or social media accounts weighed down with much more than her personal thoughts, snippets of poetry or skewed selfies posed in the weirdest corners of our fair city. Adia’s making music, alright, but she has the confidence to wait patiently and make us do so, too, while she works on her debut LP – which we’ve been lucky enough to hear rough snippets of in all it’s oozing bluesy glory; raspy and opinionated; aggressive and sexy, wagging dirty vamps and licks in the faces of anyone that might come its way, spitting lyrics like “you ask me a question, I tell you a lie” with no apologies. When she sings, it’s a like a woman both possessed and in full control, eagerly embracing the grasp the music takes on her – and on us. I mean, those eyes…

As she once scribbled, “I remember way back when my mind split open and to my surprise locked inside were demons screaming, teaming leading me into a sick sing along madness lived and made into song I am a woman with ten thousand stories for tell.” Indeed.

Adia’s currently recording with Roger Moutenot (Those Darlins, Yo La Tengo, Jeff The Brotherhood), and the Darlins and William Tyler are both big fans – though you can become one yourself by catching her live on Saturday, at Lockeland Springsteen Presents ::: Tristen, Adia Victoria and the Wans at Exit/In. We guarantee it will be one of those moments you’ll brag about in years to come. After all, we all want to look like we have good foresight.

For Adia’s Nashville Five, she helped us discover Five Places to Fall Out of Time in Nashville. You could go to one of these places…or you could just listen to Adia’s music.


By Adia Victoria :::

1.) Goodlettsville Antique District ::: Ever since I was young I’ve had a fascination with all things old and dusty. The Goodlettsville Antique District has become one of my favorite locations to spend a leisure weekend morning. I like to go with my mother and spend hours rifling through cob web filled basements brimming with all kinds of treasures. All the shop owners are really friendly, some even welcome you with free coffee and cookies upon arrival. Free food and time travel–can’t beat it.

2.) The Arcade ::: I adore the arcade. It’s a pedestrian market dating back to the early 20th century and everything in there is just tinged with this otherworldly creepiness. I ate my first fried pie there. I have literally huffed it to Katie’s Meat and 3 on foot after work to catch Fried Shrimp Friday before they sell out. This place inspires me each time I’m there.

3.) Music City Central bus station ::: I don’t own a car or have a driver’s license, so much of my time is spent on MTA bussing around town. I love watching the buses come and go as people go about their day. I like the togetherness of bus riders–you’re forced to interact with people you wouldn’t normally meet if you were isolated in your car. Sometimes I write songs and poems about the people riding the bus with me–there’s some real characters riding the Nashville MTA.

4.) Jefferson street ::: One of my favorite walks is up and down Jefferson street. In the 1920’s Jefferson street was the heart of black wealth in Nashville. Both my brother’s attended Fisk university, so Jefferson holds quite a special place in my heart. It’s an area rich in African American history and quite off the beaten path for tourists in Nashville.

5.) Mom’s house ::: When I first moved to Nashville my mothers home in north Nashville was all I knew. I didn’t have a job and I didn’t know anyone so her home was ground zero for me. Anytime I get overwhelmed I hop on the bus from east Nashville to spend time with my family. She has an amazing view of the Nashville skyline so I can survey the city from a safe distance. Plus the fridge is always full.

Photo By Veta&Theo for Ovvio Arte

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Marissa is the editor of Lockeland Springsteen.

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